Malaysian Business : Revival

We Are Back!

That was the rebirth issue of the Malaysian Business in April 2017.

Malaysian BusinessThis magazine was one of my main reading requirements when I was still a relationship manager for Business Banking and Commercial Banking way back in the early 2000’s. It gave me some insights for my daily conversation with customers. Nowadays I hardly read an actual magazine; all been replaced by this thing called Mobile Phone. So it was a surprise to see this magazine making a comeback.
Acquired by the Amanie group owned by Datuk Dr Daud Bakar, I was expecting the contents to be Islamic Banking-heavy. But I think in keeping with the original spirit of its readership, it is Malaysian Business as usual (no pun intended!). There are some contents on Islamic Banking and Services, and I guess the editors are taking it one subject at a time.

Ahmad FaizalSo I spoke to my trusted counterpart, Ahmad Faizal (pic), to ask his opinion on the magazine and his thoughts on the comeback. The common magazines come to mind; Personal Money and TheEdge. Simply because of the established contents and great stories that grab attention. Malaysian Business needs to benchmark itself to these magazines. Especially during times that there is insufficient readerships of physical magazines. Faizal also observed that there is no emphasis on Islamic Banking, which may well be a differentiation factor. Faizal also have fond memories for Islamic Banker magazine edited by Mushtak Parker. Many new information covered in the magazine for example the latest structure of deals etc. and hoping that Malaysian Business adopt certain areas based on this magazine.

Early days yet. I love the rebirth, and hope to have more. Heard the May issue is out.  Gotta get it. Click on the picture below to go to www.malaysian-business.com & happy reading!

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[Excerpt from Datuk Dr Daud Bakar FB page]

Revival of Malaysian Business Magazine – Amanie Media – New Editor in Chief

DDDBI am happy to share with you that we have launched Malaysia’s Premier Business Magazine in April 2017.

First published in 1972, the magazine, now to be published by new owner Amanie Media Sdn Bhd with founder and renowned Global Entrepreneur and Shariah scholar Datuk Dr Mohd Daud Bakar as the Editor in Chief, is set to hit the news-stands in April 2017.

With the theme of Hope for The Malaysian Nation, Malaysian Business is on a mission to be at the forefront of motivational and inspiring business establishments’ stories. From financial advice for start-up companies to success stories from millionaire business founders, Malaysian Business aims to help readers at enlivening their passion and business goals in life.

The magazine spans on a range of business topics, technology insights, business culture, personal financing tips as well as stories of successful entrepreneurs who share secrets of their success from the ground up.

Sections in the magazine will include:

  • Trending Facts and News – Highlights of International and Local News
  • Corporate and Market Capital Roundup – review on latest market updates
  • MB Preneur – Stories from the Unsung Heroes of SME’s
  • Walking down Memory Lane – Stories on how we can recreate success histories
  • Reader’s Page – Pour your thoughts out, we want to hear from you!
  • After Biz – an insight into the latest gadgets, automotive and trends

Come and join our network of trade leaders and key players by subscribing to Malaysian Business!

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German Banks: More Islamic than Islamic Banks?

In one of my engagements a couple of years ago,  I had the fortune to present my views on the Islamic Banking industry and its challenges in front of an audience in INCEIF. One of the bright participants there had subsequently proceeded to complete her MSc Research and recently gotten in touch with me. I had a read of what she had published, and it is a remarkable piece of academia. I have since asked for her permission to publish it on this site, for the benefits of other readers. Good food for thought.

Thank you Ms Rosana Gulzar Mohd, for your allowance to this request.

Overall, I find the research quite enlightening and overall accurate. It is also a good reminder of what we still need to achieve to ensure Islamic Banking remains focused and strong for the foreseeable future. Happy reading and do give your constructive feedback on the paper for our discussion.
Note : Ms Rosana was a student from INCEIF : The Global University of Islamic Finance and recently finished her MSc thesis concluding that a) Islamic banks are not really ‘Islamic’ and b) the recommendations for reforms. The analysis centres on the industry in Malaysia. She is keen to pursue her PhD. (Click this link for alternate site to download research)
Middle East Institute – National University of Singapore
Abstract:
This study, which compares the German system with Malaysia in the hope of improving Islamic finance, uncovers four paradoxes. Germany is chosen because its focus on mutuality and small enterprises, at the expense of profit maximisation, not only embodies the Shariah principles of justice and social welfare but also makes the system more stable. The banks’ profitability and stability between 2006 and 2014 are compared. This covers their performances before, during and after the global financial crisis. The indicators used are the banks’ return on average equity (ROAE), return on average asset (ROAA) and net loan to deposits and short-term funding. While this study finds that Malaysian banks, including Islamic ones, are indeed significantly more profitable and efficient than German banks, it uncovers four paradoxes. Firstly, it is ironical that Malaysian commercial banks are less aggressive than the Germans in their loans-to-deposit ratio. Secondly, the profitability of Malaysian development financial institutions (DFIs) and banking cooperatives are comparable, if not higher, than its commercial banks. Thirdly, the ROAE for Malaysian banking cooperatives rose 41% during the 2008 crisis when other banks’ fell. The last paradox is that while Malaysian commercial banks seem prudent in their lending, the DFIs and banking cooperatives are leveraged to an alarming extent. This study concludes with two reform recommendations: a rethink of the economic drivers in Malaysia and a sprucing up of the DFIs and cooperatives’ balance sheets towards national standards.