Popular Islamic Finance Terms

While Islamic Banking in general has been codified since early 1980’s in Malaysia, the familiarity to Islamic Banking or Finance terms remain a challenge. Terms like Mudarabah or Musyarakah or Wakalah remains difficult to remember but also it’s meaning have been lost to many, although there has been many attempts to communicate the various glossaries already available.

This makes the layman to go back to something more familiar, in most cases it is conventional banking, simply because of the ingrained understanding of conventional banking terms and terminologies. Some become “allergic” to Islamic terms simply because of the fear of failing to explain and understand the “arabic” terms. It does seem a daunting task to remember the terms, and understand what they mean.

So, I picked up a simple slide from a friend from IBFIM ie Haji Razli Ramli (his introduction available here in this website – click here) and made it into  a simple slide.

Get familiar with the terms for Islamic Finance, the easy way. Click on this 1-minute video. Share this video with friends. Know the meaning of those Arabic word. It’s quick and simple. In both English and Bahasa Malaysia. Comments are also appreciated.

Also, you can download the file into your desktop or mobile at the following links:

Share out to your friends. Thank you.

 

VideoBlog : Islamic Finance

One of my ultimate dream is to have VideoBlogs for this site. I have dreamt it for quite some time but it has been hard to find the opportunity to create one according to what I envision. InshaAllah that day will come, although I am not sure I am photogenic enough to be on “TV”.

CDIFBut a friend has managed to realise that vision. Hussain Kureshi whom became an acquaintance a couple of years ago, took that bold step to make a difference. He self-produced a series on Islamic Finance, following the launch of his book (Contracts and Deals in Islamic Finance) and I must say I am impressed.

So when Hussain asked me if he can feature his VideoBlogs on this site, it was my absolute honour to have it. Please do visit and take a listen to the various topics he has elaborated upon. As at yesterday, there’s already 20 VideoBlogs (YouTube) that you can go through. Looking forward to more additions in the future.

Click on the picture of the book to go to the VideoBlog page. Happy listening.

Types of Sukuk

One of the topics that I hardly write about are Sukuk (islamic Bonds). Unfortunately, I am not greatly involved in many Sukuk deals, either by design or exposure. In my line of work, I get to see the legal documents, but somewhat uninvolved when it comes to actual structuring. There are many, many experts in the field so I will not even attempt to pretend what they do is easy.

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But I did come across this interesting presentation on the types of Sukuk. A presentation I saw on Linkedin by Camille Paldi on the Types of Sukuk provides an excellent introduction to the subject. With her permission, I attached herewith the presentation on Sukuk in pdf for your easy download.

Click here to read Types of Sukuk (PDF format)

Also, I notice Camille Paldi writes (via her presentation slides) a massive amount of literature on Islamic Banking, which is a trove of information for someone who seeks it. Do have a read on her other presentations as well.

Happy reading.

Most Commonly Used Islamic Banking Contracts

It is reaching the end of the year and I thought it will be good to have a quick look on how many Islamic Banking contracts that we have in and around the industry. Granted, I might miss some of the contracts as there are many banks offering hybrids nowadays. I do apologise for such shortfall, and will endeavour to update this chart as often as possible, should there be some interesting and new contracts being introduced in the Islamic Banking industry.

Common Islamic Contracts

For pdf, please click here

In general, common Islamic Banking contracts can be segregated into a few categories:

  • Gratuitous Contracts

These types of contracts are typically unilateral in nature where the contracts do not require mutual consent to be applied. It is just a one-way arrangement where one party provides a product or service based on mandates or scope of work and is at discretion to vary the terms without requiring the other party to specifically accept the changes. For example, the Hibah contract (Gift). One party provides the gift, and the other party receives the gift. It should be on a unilateral / discretionary basis by it not being “promissory”.

Another example is the contract of Qard (Loan). One party lends money to the other party, and the other party (borrower) undertakes to pay back the loan (original amount) when required by the lending party, without any expectation of additional return. But the other party (borrower) can pay more than the original amount (by way of Gift) but is not obliged to, and such additional gift do not require the borrower to obtain “consent” from the lender to be given. It is simply the payment of the loan, and any other gift (which is not obligatory). Such “gifts” avoid the definition of Riba’ by being not promissory.

Under gratuitous contracts, the Aqad is not greatly necessary (it being unilateral) but it will be ideal for all parties if an Aqad can be concluded upon.

  • Trading Contracts

Trading or transactional contracts are debt-based contracts. Very similar in nature and intention to a conventional loan, but requires specific Islamic contract to be perfectly executed to avoid riba’. Such contracts greatly involves the participation of 2 parties (sometimes 3 or multiple parties) and there is a defined Aqad executed to finalised the terms and conditions to the contract. These terms are to be defined and agreed upon within the Ijab/Qabul period for all parties to accept. Once accepted, any proposed further changes captured in the Aqad must be accepted by all parties by mutual consent.

A common example will be a Murabaha financing transaction, where the terms and conditions are agreed up-front in a bilateral agreement. A purchase price is discussed, together with the profit amount, selling price and the settlement tenure. Ownership of the asset (used as an underlying asset for the Murabaha) is also moved between the parties, and transactional sequence is observed. Any changes that is proposed outside the Aqad majlis will require approval and consent by all parties.

A Leasing contract is also deemed a bilateral contract although the owner of the asset has the right to unilaterally increase or revise the rental amount of the asset under hire / rental, the person who lease that asset will also have a right to remain in or exit out of the leasing arrangement, thus making it bilateral (where there is also a material change in the terms and conditions.

The perfection of Aqad holds great importance to Transactional Contracts to ensure the validity of the transactions.

  • Investment Contracts

These types of contracts deals more on equity and corresponding returns in the subject matter. It follows the concept of investment where such equity-based structures takes on the risks of the investments, and concentrate on the concept of entrepreneurship and risk-sharing. In such contracts, where there is an element of trust, bilateral arrangements are strictly adhered to. Changes to the terms and conditions requires explicit consent especially from the party that is in a disadvantageous position.

The most popular of these contracts is the Mudharabah, which is used in many depository products. However, although this is technically a deposit, these deposits must be utilised or deployed into economic transaction for the purpose of generating a return on the capital i.e. in this case, the Mudharabah deposit. Once profit is recognised (if ever…) then the profit must be distributed to the customers based on the agreed Mudharabah profit sharing ratios. The Bank, usually acting as a Mudharib (fund manager / entrepreneur) , will behave as a pure entrepreneur with the customer (as Rab Ul Mal), acting as the fund provider with the possibility that the investments is not up-to-market returns which can result in both loss in profit and loss of principal (principal not guaranteed).

Another example. Under a Musharakah structure, there  is even more defined roles that the all parties must take and agree under a bilateral arrangement. With Musharakah, each party will be required to contribute equity (or capital) and even contribute expertise into the partnership venture to ensure profit can be made. All terms and conditions are captured as part of the important Aqad. Any profits declared will be shared according to equity ratio or agreed profit sharing ratio, and any losses shall also be shared amongst partners, usually based on equity ratio or equity contribution.

  • Supporting Contracts

Supporting contracts are often important because they act to complete many aspects of services, products and banking. Many supporting contracts are created to cater mostly for specific situation and most of it requires proper Aqad as well. Such contracts are also considered a facility to provide specific outcomes for the customer. It also falls into a bilateral arrangement.

Popular contracts include the contract of Kafalah (guarantee) where a person can enter into a Kafalah to secure a financing facility by providing a letter of guarantee. Other contracts include Rahn (mortgage or pawn broking) that has specific terms to the arrangements, Hamish Jiddiyyah (security deposit) or even Wakalah (Agency for services)

  • Contractual Arrangements

Contractual Arrangement are not necessarily contracts on its own, but can be construed as a combination of contracts to achieve a certain objective. The arrangement itself is not legally binding, but what is inside those arrangements are usually standalone valid Islamic Banking contracts.

Take for example the contractual arrangement of Tawarruq. Inside a Tawarruq arrangement, it consists of several standalone Islamic Banking contracts. Firstly there is the contract of Wakalah (Agency) to purchase the commodities on behalf of the transacting party. Secondly, there is the contract of Commodity Murabahah where the commodities purchased will be sold at a Sale Price to the purchasing party. Once the Commodity ownership is transferred into the purchasing party, the purchasing party can make an offer to another party as a Musawamah (simple sale) to obtain the desired cash.

Other contractual arrangement is the arrangement for Wa’ad (Promise) usually used for FX transactions. A Wa’ad itself is not binding, but it can be enforced upon certain events where eventually an exchange can be made (Sarf) or even a Commodity Murabahah is executed to deliver certain obligations.

Again, these are not exhaustive list of contracts, and can easily be expanded in a short period of time. Innovations are done everyday, and it will be a matter of time until critical mass will push a contract to the forefront. I hope to keep updating this list more in the coming years.

Wallahualam.

Synopsis of 2013 BNM Exposure Drafts

The following is what I understood from the various Exposure Drafts issued by BNM on 9 December 2013. Of the 7 exposure drafts that we received, I have earlier summarised the Wadiah Exposure Draft, and I will ignore the Bai-Inah Exposure Draft as we are no longer subscribing to the Bai Inah structure at the workplace.

Please find the remaining Exposure Draft review for your understanding.

Kafalah ED

2013 ED – Kafalah – One of the key issues for a Kafala (Guarantee) contract is the charging of fees for providing the guarantee services. The main issue has always been the quantum of fees charged, either in percentage of the financing or via a fixed charge for all financing amount. The justification of this charge is always tricky, because technically the fee should not be imposed if there is no call for the guarantee (in cases of no default). The guarantee will only materialise if the customer defaults, that’s when the work happens to justify any fees. Issuing a piece of paper at the start of the relationship to guarantee the amount does not amount to too much work, and there no funds disbursed to any parties (unfunded). To justify the charging of any fees based on percentage instead of actual work, especially for huge amounts of financing guarantee, can be problematic to justify in the eyes of Sharia.

Waad ED

2013 ED – Wa’d – At one point of time, Wa’ad (Promise) seems to be the answer to many structures, where a promise is given without any requirement to transact before a specific event. The terms therefore can be negotiated and re-negotiated without the need to strictly specify the terms of the transaction and re-signing of documents. This gives a lot of leeway for deals to happen.However, at the end of the day, Wa’ad remains as only a promise, legally distanced from a contract or an agreement. Enforcement at the courts are therefore without full confirmation of all the terms, and makes for a loose structure and potential disputes. This flexibility and enforceability remains one of the key risks to a Wa’ad contract, which is why until today Wa’ad is generally transacted between known parties i.e. between established and trusted Financial Institutions.

Wakala ED

2013 ED – Wakalah – Wakala (Agency) will remain an integral contract for Islamic Banking as it validates a lot of action that can be done by the Bank, in order to remain efficient. In general, Banks hold a lot of expertise in various fields, such as investments, financing, leasing and trading; something a normal customer may not want to be involved in on a daily basis. An Agency arrangement conveniently provides for this. Anything that improves the efficiency by leveraging on the Bank’s expertise and infrastructure, can be arranged via Agency. However, the way we practice it usually is transparent to the customer. In practice, Agency Fees are the right of the Agent, and the waiver of such fees, although allowed, is sometime seen as not adhering to the spirit of Agency and entrepreneurship. You do the work as an Agent, but don’t earn any fees as it is waived. In real life, this does not happen as whenever a work is completed, you should earn something.

Tawarruq

2013 ED – Tawarruq – As Tawarruq (Three-party Murabaha Sale) becomes more prominent in the Malaysian market, I was surprised that the ED was not more comprehensive than this. There are sequencing issues not addressed but more importantly, there is a lack of illustration on what is defined as Tawarruq. Is there any difference between a Tawarruq and Commodity Murabaha, which essentially is a 4 party transaction? The issue of interconditionality is adequately addressed in the ED but I would love to have seen more details related to products, such as for Islamic Credit Cards and Revolving Credit with a rebate structure (Ibra’) based on a floating rate financing. It mentions that the discount can be given based on certain benchmark agreed by the contracting parties. This opens the clause to various interpretation as it is without real detail.

I will look at the Hibah (Gift) ED but essentially, it is related to the Wadiah ED. Most of what’s covered under the Hibah ED is relevant to the Wadiah product, such as the discretionary Hibah issue and the giving of Hibah becoming a business practice (Urf Tijari) which can be construed as Riba (Usury). Wait for the posting.

Thank you for reading, hope everyone have an enjoyable holiday period ahead. Wasalam.

Readings : December Papers x 3

Murabaha

And to close off the year, BNM gave us a further 3 reading gifts for us to enjoy our holidays:

  1. Murabahah (2013)
  2. CP Mudarabah (SR,OP, OR)
  3. CP Musharakah (SR,OP,OR)

The Murabahah Standards looks interesting, and so is the Mudarabah Concept Paper. Do have a read and tell us what you think.

Looking forward to the coming holidays.

Exposure Draft : Wadiah

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One of the panic buttons we are pressing now is the new Wadiah Exposure Draft (ED). As a rule, Wadiah is a “safe-keeping with guarantee” arrangement, where a Bank agrees to take on-board customers deposits as a loan (Qardh). And in the rules of loan under Islamic Banking, a loan must be returned on the same amount when required; any amount above and beyond the loan amount, if put as a condition at the start or during of the deposit placement, may be construed as “Riba”. If the Bank utilises the deposits for any business activities, the Bank is given the discretion to award “Hibah” or gift payments allocated based on the balance outstanding.

With the introduction of the IFSA and the requirements that Malaysian Banks comply with the Investment Account Framework  if Mudarabah continued to be offered to Customers, the common wisdom is to migrate lock-stock-and-barrel into a Wadiah account. In my earlier writings, I already mentioned that to comply with the Investment Account Framework, a massive shift in thinking, processes, and management is required. Therefore to convert into a Wadiah structure may not be the ideal solution, but it will provide an “easier” route towards retaining Customers’ deposit.

Wadiah ED

However, in this chess game between the Islamic Banks and Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM), the new ED is introduced on Wadiah has effectively further tied the hands of the industry players. BNM had anticipated the industry intentions to move the Mudarabah structure into Wadiah, and promptly outlined further restrictions on Wadiah itself. The industry is now caught between a cold and hard place; stay with Mudarabah and comply with Investment Account Framework, or migrate into Wadiah and comply with the new Wadiah Guidelines.

Wadiah Concept Paper

As we know, Wadiah also puts significant limitation on the marketing of returns and benefits to customers for their deposits. BNM took this a step further; to emphasize that returns on a Wadiah account should always be discretionary, as Wadiah is now seen as a loan. The impact comes in several clauses in the Exposure Draft:

  1. Wadiah Yad Dhammanh is considered similar in nature to Qard. Therefore the rules of Qardh should also apply to Wadiah.
  2. A majority of customers should not be getting a return on the deposit under Qardh. Generally this is saying that out of 100 customers, only 49% of customer will be given a “gift” on their deposits
  3. The payment of the discretionary “gift” should not be construed as regular or common business practice (Urf’ Tijari) else it will imply that the “gift” is a constant return to the customer. Historical performance can be shown to customers.
  4. Any benefits, monetary or otherwise, deriving directly from the placement in the Wadiah account may be construed as “Riba” as well.
  5. Any benefits includes scenarios where should the Wadiah account be opened as part of a financing facility, and benefits enjoyed in the financing facility from amounts available in the Wadiah account (for example a rebate structure to off-set an obligation), shall be construed as riba’ as well.

My main question is; now that Mudharabah is turned into a pure investment account, and Wadiah carrying so many restrictions, what other solutions are there? It cannot be that BNM only expects us to comply but do not help with a viable solution on these restrictions. Yes we are looking at the Commodity Murabahah structures, but operationally this will be a challenge for the Banks to control the cost of commodity trade.

Wadiah ED

And how do we define majority, then? The system must now be enhanced to determine who gets the discretionary “gifts” based on which formula. Even if they qualify for the discretionary “gifts”, to award them on a regular basis will also lead to it be construed as “Urf Tijari”, where consistent payment of Hibah will imply a similar future returns. How do we define this “non-majority” of Customers whom qualifies for Hibah but do not get regular awards of Hibah? What system logic can we build and will what we build be acceptable to Sharia? More importantly, would the customer even accept such “discretionary” practice?

Now that BNM has issued a new Concept Paper on Shariah Requirements, Optional Practices and Operational Requirements of Mudarabah today, we get a somewhat watered-down requirements to Mudarabah products. I have read it and saw that under this new Framework, the Mudarabah structure remains viable as it is, with enhancements needed for documentation and disclosures. Manageable and workable. The next steps must be; if we were to stick with Mudarabah, which Framework will take precedent. Mudarabah is an Investment structure. So, would we follow the Mudarabah Framework, or to comply with the Investment Account Framework? Both Frameworks makes reference to each other; yet one is stricter than the other.

I am putting all my hopes on the new Framework. That will give me some leeway of having both Wadiah structure and a viable Mudarabah structure (not based on the Investment Account Framework). This is definitely the light at the end of the tunnel. But as usual, indications are to take the “stricter” guidelines into account, rather than keeping hope for an easier implementation.