Malaysian Business : Revival

We Are Back!

That was the rebirth issue of the Malaysian Business in April 2017.

Malaysian BusinessThis magazine was one of my main reading requirements when I was still a relationship manager for Business Banking and Commercial Banking way back in the early 2000’s. It gave me some insights for my daily conversation with customers. Nowadays I hardly read an actual magazine; all been replaced by this thing called Mobile Phone. So it was a surprise to see this magazine making a comeback.
Acquired by the Amanie group owned by Datuk Dr Daud Bakar, I was expecting the contents to be Islamic Banking-heavy. But I think in keeping with the original spirit of its readership, it is Malaysian Business as usual (no pun intended!). There are some contents on Islamic Banking and Services, and I guess the editors are taking it one subject at a time.

Ahmad FaizalSo I spoke to my trusted counterpart, Ahmad Faizal (pic), to ask his opinion on the magazine and his thoughts on the comeback. The common magazines come to mind; Personal Money and TheEdge. Simply because of the established contents and great stories that grab attention. Malaysian Business needs to benchmark itself to these magazines. Especially during times that there is insufficient readerships of physical magazines. Faizal also observed that there is no emphasis on Islamic Banking, which may well be a differentiation factor. Faizal also have fond memories for Islamic Banker magazine edited by Mushtak Parker. Many new information covered in the magazine for example the latest structure of deals etc. and hoping that Malaysian Business adopt certain areas based on this magazine.

Early days yet. I love the rebirth, and hope to have more. Heard the May issue is out.  Gotta get it. Click on the picture below to go to www.malaysian-business.com & happy reading!

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[Excerpt from Datuk Dr Daud Bakar FB page]

Revival of Malaysian Business Magazine – Amanie Media – New Editor in Chief

DDDBI am happy to share with you that we have launched Malaysia’s Premier Business Magazine in April 2017.

First published in 1972, the magazine, now to be published by new owner Amanie Media Sdn Bhd with founder and renowned Global Entrepreneur and Shariah scholar Datuk Dr Mohd Daud Bakar as the Editor in Chief, is set to hit the news-stands in April 2017.

With the theme of Hope for The Malaysian Nation, Malaysian Business is on a mission to be at the forefront of motivational and inspiring business establishments’ stories. From financial advice for start-up companies to success stories from millionaire business founders, Malaysian Business aims to help readers at enlivening their passion and business goals in life.

The magazine spans on a range of business topics, technology insights, business culture, personal financing tips as well as stories of successful entrepreneurs who share secrets of their success from the ground up.

Sections in the magazine will include:

  • Trending Facts and News – Highlights of International and Local News
  • Corporate and Market Capital Roundup – review on latest market updates
  • MB Preneur – Stories from the Unsung Heroes of SME’s
  • Walking down Memory Lane – Stories on how we can recreate success histories
  • Reader’s Page – Pour your thoughts out, we want to hear from you!
  • After Biz – an insight into the latest gadgets, automotive and trends

Come and join our network of trade leaders and key players by subscribing to Malaysian Business!

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The Wayang Kulit of Islamic Finance: Book Review

Islamic Finance in The Global EconomyIslamic Finance has seen many criticisms for the past decades, ranging from whether the right model was introduced in the first place, to questions on the mirroring of conventional products into islamic alternatives, accusations of Hilah and back-door riba, suitability of certain contracts in the banking space, and even the end accomplishment of the Maqasid of Sharia via a financial intermediary model.

Practitioners and regulators (including Sharia scholars) have been hard at work to address these issues (which the public seems to assume we are not aware of in the first place!!!). To a certain extent, a lot of the issues have been / are being addressed (whether to its full satisfaction or otherwise), but it is also important to be able to sit and identify areas where further improvements can be made.

Ms Rosana has become an avid observer of Islamic Finance practices and its shortfall, and found literatures that she hopes to bring forward into the constructive discussion with the industry. Her review today covers the book by Ibrahim Warde : Islamic Finance in the Global Economy (2010).

Review by Rosana Gulzar (Excerpt)

This book by Ibrahim Warde, a US academic, is among a few in the genre of political economy of Islamic finance. Although a much needed subject, it is hardly discussed in classrooms apparently due to political sensitivities. That may be the reason why this book stands out in its contribution but it can also very well stand on its own merits. The content is refreshingly intellectual, critical and direct. But even as I find it to be the most enlightening book I have read on the subject, I wish for more.

The question is, what is ‘political economy’? Or what does the subject cover? It is a fascinating field of economics which goes beyond the simple study of processes. Instead of describing production and trade as if they operate in silos or the often used phrase in economics, ceteris parabus (assuming all else stay constant – seriously, which world is that?), the study of ‘political economy’ combines theories from political science and sociology to bring about a fuller and more realistic perspective on how a country is run. A branch of political economics even draws from other academic areas such as culture and history. This definition from Investopedia is to me, the most appealing though it is arguably not the most reliable source: “International political economy is ultimately concerned with how political forces like states, individual actors, and institutions shape systems through global economic interactions and how such actions effect political structures and outcomes”.

The study of political economy is vital, I argue, in Islamic finance because how does one begin to understand a phenomenon without a frank discussion on the forces shaping it. To borrow from the Indonesians, who are the real dalangs (puppeteers) in this wayang kulit (traditional puppet-show)? Who are pulling the strings? As Warde says, “Quantity, not quality, is the defining feature of writings on Islamic finance. The recent boom in Islamic finance has resulted in a flood of writings that add very little to our understanding of a complex and multifaceted phenomenon. Overall, scholarship is marred by four flaws: the ‘authorised’ nature and pre-ordained conclusions of a significant portion of it; narrow geographic focus and lack of comparative analysis; reductionism (religious, financial, and legal); and faulty assumptions about the relation between theory and practice (p. 8).” In short, we have barely scratched the surface.

TO READ FULL COMMENTARY ON THE BOOK, CLICK ON THIS LINK

TO GO TO MS ROSANA GULZAR PAGE, CLICK ON THIS LINK 

To have an open and honest discussion, do have a read a give us your thoughts, especially on the political economy aspect of Islamic Finance. Comments and feedback welcome.